Friday, September 21, 2007

Back after these messages

If you see an advertisement featuring a woman in a black shirt and white trousers, is your immediate assumption that the advert is for: a) anti-dandruff shampoo; or b) some form of feminine hygiene product? Or maybe some new-fangled piece of jiggery-pokery that does both?

Also, can anybody explain to me what's so offensive about the word 'cookie'? I've got a hunch it's something to do with ladies' bits, but I'm not sure.

6 comments:

DaveHill said...

The "cookie" problem is a mystery to me too. Perhaps it's my great age, but there again none of my children snigger if I offer them a packet of Marylands.

Tim Footman said...

As somebody has sagely pointed out, 'Peter' is also a standard American term for 'penis', and the idea of a blue one had little appeal.

James said...

Lost on me too...

It can't be that bad as apparently when Blue Peter apologise to their audience at the start of the new series they will be introducing a new kitten which will be called Cookie.

Valerie said...

I don't really know anything bad about 'Cookie'. Mysterious. On the other hand, as you say, "Blue Peter" sounds to an American like what happens when a piano lid falls a little too close to where you're standing -- or when a hot blonde takes you all the way to the bedroom, then suddenly has to go home and wash her hair. Not pleasant.

A black shirt and white trousers mostly suggests to me that she has an unusually buttockless figure, because that's a hard duo to get away with....

llewtrah said...

"Cookie" is offensive because the proper word in this country is "biscuit" and British kids must learn not to use Merkinisms. Political correctness gone mad, I tell you!

Tim Footman said...

Maybe the hot, buttockless blonde leads the guy to the bedroom, but doesn't do anything because it's the wrong time of the month (or maybe because she's embarrassed about her dandruff, which may in fact be cookie - sorry, biscuit - crumbs).